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Downloads Home » Best Files » Der Fall von Sacsahuamán (German)

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Der Fall von Sacsahuamán (German)

Author File Description
Dave_the_Wave
File Details
Version: The Conquerors
Style: Mix
We write the year 1532 - [i]Francisco Pizarro[/i] and his conquistadors are landed at the west-coast of the Inca-Empire. Play for the Spanish and conquer for "oro et gloria" such great citys like Cuzco or Quito. But how can 180 man win a battle against an army which numbers go into the millions...?
AuthorComments & Reviews   ( All | Comments Only | Reviews Only )
Tom Edwards I'm sure it's great, but this s a predominantly English speaking site.
Ingo van Thiel
Rating
4.4
Breakdown
Playability4.0
Balance4.0
Creativity4.0
Map Design5.0
Story/Instructions5.0
"The Fall of Sacsahuamán" is an epic scenario about Pizarro's fight against the Aztecs. As it is in German, I guess I have to restrict my recommendation to players who are able to speak the language. If the author decides to translate his campaign, it would surely be worth it. In spite of some bugs and some crashes, it is most certainly one of the best Mesoamerican scenarios I have seen.

Playability: It was an exciting game with changing objectives and alternative branches that kept me entertained throughout. What are you going to do: Withdraw into the mountains to avoid the attack, or make a stand on that hill? On the other hand, some crashes marred the experience for me. Most of those crashes were to blame on "Change View" triggers. Saving your game very often is a must, not only because of the tough challenges where one move can cost you everything. To solve the change view crash problem, I suggest the author does two things: First, split the change view triggers up into several smaller view changes that happen one after the other. Second, the first change view trigger could do with an additional "object visible" condition that makes sure the player has his view on the right location when the trigger starts. The object could be a stone mine or a tree in that place (preferably on a cliff, so that it cannot be mined/chopped off). To give one example: I built a monastery to lay the foundation of Lima, but I didn't keep my eyes on my builders, because my armies were busy on another part of the map. When the monastery was finished, a change view trigger abruptly tried to bring me back to that location... another crash. Another thing, which looked like a trigger mistake: The allied gate to my last enemy did not open. I destroyed it with the attack ground command of my siege weapons, passed through, and the scenario continued smoothly until the end.

Balance: Very challenging to say the least. Sometimes I feel the author might have eased up a bit on players. When your build-up begins, you can decide whether to start out with a dark age town center without anything to help you, or with an additional castle and in castle age – but without any other upgrades. I chose the latter, "easy" option, but no matter how fast I tried to build up, my first base and my few men were soon crumbled by a never-ending flood of imperial age pikemen, champions and onagers... and finally two trebuchets which were impossible to take out because the area was swarming with anti-horse units. I finally survived this part by harvesting there for the first ten minutes, and then withdrawing onto a relatively safe island with stone and gold mines. I must compliment the author for making a very effective and merciless Ai that tries to hunt you down wherever you go. I built ridiculously thick lines of four walls to block the cliffed path down to the shallows, and to the island, and yet the computer seemed to know exactly where to go and what to do... the pace with which the walls were taken down gave me the impression I was fighting a human player. Anyhow, it gave me some precious minutes to build up more. When the two trebuchets and onagers were taken out, I was finally able to hold the last line of wall that blocked off the shallows, although the attacks continued. After that, the game was still very challenging, but more balanced. The very last battle was very stiff and exciting, and gave the scenario a great ending.

Map Design: A great map, with a neat jungle with mixed trees, rocks, flowers and a good overall attention to detail. The city of Cuzco was nicely done. It might have looked even better and alive with a few more details, such as some more trees and other Gaia elements in a few spots. Yet, a narrow top score as the rest of the map was excellent.

Creativity: The ghostly zero-hp tower was an interesting addition I had not seen before, and the scenario has a good creativity overall: In the way the objectives change, your alternative choices of gameplay, and the voiced instructions. Creating such an epic game is very creative, there is no doubt about that.

Story/Instructions: Spectacular! This part really stands out. Not only does the campaign contain some nice historical background and clearly written instructions, but the in-game comments are also voiced... and they are voiced very well. The introductory cutscene begins with a speaker in the off who comments on the historical events. This was well pulled off and reminded me of a documentary movie. During the game, the speaker also uses some different intonations and accents during conversations, without making it sound too artificial. Probably the best voiced campaign I've seen so far. The only additional suggestion I have is to tell players in the objectives that they should also get their hero across that bridge; even if this is stated in the hints, players will miss this if they try to play without any additional help.

Overall: I very much recommend this campaign to players who speak German.
Tupac Yupanqui Quote: But how can 180 man win a battle against an army which numbers go into the millions...?
-Because Pizarro have THOUSANDS of allied indians.
-Becaues the Spanish have gunpowder and steel

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Rating
4.4
Breakdown
Playability4.0
Balance4.0
Creativity4.0
Map Design5.0
Story/Instructions5.0
Statistics
Downloads:1,612
Favorites: [Who?]0
Size:2.76 MB
Added:08/25/02